Inspiring massage education and wellness for the body, mind, and spirit

Category Archives for: Ariana Institute

Healing with Aromatherapy Massage

January 04, 2017 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

What Is Aromatherapy?aroma-906137_1280

Aromatherapy is the art and science of utilizing naturally extracted aromatic essences to balance, harmonize, and promote the health of body, mind, and spirit. It is a natural therapy using various essential oils gathered from certain fragrant plants that have the ability to aid us both physically and psychologically.

Essential oils are potent, volatile essences found in different parts of the plant such as the flowers, twigs, leaves and bark, or in the rind of fruit. For example, in roses the oil is in the flowers, in basil it is in the leaves and in sandalwood it is in the wood. These fragrances can be used either alone or in combinations to create desired effects.

 

How Aromatherapy Essential Oils Work

For hundreds of years essential oils, derived from roots, herbs, and flowers have been used to enhance emotional, spiritual, and physical well-being.

Essential oils have an immediate impact on our sense of smell, also known as olfaction. When essential oils are inhaled, olfactory receptor cells are stimulated and the impulse is transmitted to the emotional center of the brain, or limbic system.

The limbic system is connected to areas of the brain linked to breathing and blood circulation, memory, and the endocrine glands that regulate hormone levels in the body. The properties of the oil, its fragrance, and its effects determine how these systems are stimulated and which neurotransmitters and feel-good, happy-hormones are released.

Aromatherapy massage is a gentle massage using essential oils that can be softening, healing, nourishing, and rejuvenating to the skin. The general benefits of massage combined with the healing benefits of certain essential oils can be very dynamic. When used in massage, essential oils are not only inhaled, but also absorbed through the skin. The oils penetrate the tissues and find their way into the bloodstream where they are transported to the organs and other systems of the body, including the nervous system. Essential oils have differing rates of absorption, varying from 20 minutes to 2 hours, so it is probably best not to bathe or shower directly following a massage to ensure maximum penetration and effectiveness of the oils.

Here are some of the general benefits of using utilizing essential oils in a massage therapy practice – remember that each essential oil carries its own unique benefits.

Physical Benefits

-Relaxes or stimulates the recipient                                           -Eases muscular aches and pains while improving muscle tone

-Relieves minor discomforts                                                        -Calms or stimulates the nervous system (depending on the oil)

-Diminishes tension headaches                                                  -Stimulates respiratory system

-Assists in reducing nerve entrapment and congestion         -Stimulates the immune system, strengthening resistance to disease 

-Improves circulation and lymphatic drainage, and helps to eliminate toxins from the body

Mental and Emotional Benefits

-Creates a feeling of well-being                                                    –Reduces levels of anxiety

-Calms or enhances mental activity and relaxation                 -Satisfies the need for caring and nurturing touch

-Increases awareness of the mind-body connection               –Releases endorphins, the brain’s natural opiates, which encourages a feeling of well-being 

Lavender Aromatherapy Benefits

lavendar-1153405_1280

Lavender is considered the most useful of all essential oils. Known to aid in the relief of headaches, insomnia, tension, and stress, lavender has therapeutic properties that have been well chronicled around the world. The essential oil of lavender is widely used for various illnesses and medical problems.

The flowery fragrance of lavender makes it the most versatile and useful essential oil. Essential oil of lavender is used in aromatherapy practices to get rid of depression, fight tiredness and enhance relaxation. A drop of lavender oil used in an aromatherapy diffuser is reputed to help relieve headaches, decrease body pain and help with insomnia. Lavender is found to increase the emotion of happiness through its calming and sedating effects.

 

 

Eucalyptus Aromatherapy Benefits

eucalyptus-771994_1280The benefits of eucalyptus essential oil can be attributed to its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, decongestant, deodorant, antiseptic, antibacterial and stimulating properties. The numerous benefits of eucalyptus oils include the fact that it aids in the reduction of mucous deposition and helps with a variety of breathing and respiratory issues such as asthma, bronchitis, nasal congestion, and sinusitis.

Since eucalyptus essential oil is analgesic and anti-inflammatory, it is also useful in relieving muscles from stiffness, aches, pains, and even nerve pain. Alternatively, eucalyptus can be used as a stimulant to remove mental exhaustion, stress, and sluggishness.

 

Clary Sage Aromatherapy Benefits

salvia-pratensis-846520_1280

Clary Sage essential oil is known to be powerful for clearing and uplifting to the body, mind, and spirit. As a potent mood enhancer and antidepressant, Clary Sage balances hormones within the body to soothe nervous tension and anxiety. It is used to boost self esteem, confidence, and mental strength to lighten the mood and clearing negative energy from a healing session.

Clary Sage is also useful in the treatment of spasms and related ailments like muscle cramps, respiratory system cramps, muscle stress, menstrual cramps, spasmodic coughs, stomachaches, headaches and migraines. This is done by relaxing nerve impulses to reduce the occurrence of uncontrollable spasms while being soothing to the skin.

Clary Sage kills bacteria and fungi, curbs the growth of bacterial infections, and protects against new infections with anti-bacterial properties. Clary Sage can be used to clear energy and disinfect the air within a healing session.

Incorporating Aromatherapy into Your Practice

aromatherapy-1

Aromatherapy is a great healing modality to incorporate into your massage practice and expand the services you provide for your clients. Depending on the desired affect, essential oils can be added to carrier oils to be used as massage oils in your sessions. Here are a few some carrier oils that can be infused with aromatherapy essential oils:

Almond oil                                        -Avocado oil

-Apricot oil                                         -Coconut oil

-Grape seed oil                                  -Jojoba oil

-Olive oil                                             -Sesame seed oil

There are many other mediums for using of essential oils for aromatherapy, such as:

-Body lotion or oil                            -Chest rub

-Compress                                         –Conditioner

-Facial mist                                        –Facial oil

-Full bath                                           –Foot bath

-Humidifier                                       –Room spray

 

Indications for Aromatherapy

Keep in mind that each unique essential oil is believed to possess its own indications and contraindications. General Indications for an Aromatherapy Session vary with the aromatherapy selected for use with:

  • Stress and tension
  • Muscular tension
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue

 

Contraindications for Aromatherapy

  • Infants, young children, and people with skin allergies may want to approach aromatherapy gingerly
  • A person suffering from a migraine may not tolerate aromatherapy fragrances well. Check with your client prior to offering aromatherapy.
  • Aromatherapy is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice. Advise your clients to consult their physicians or health care professionals if they are pregnant or elderly or if they have any chronic or recurring conditions. Honor your scope of practice and refer your client to a qualified health care practitioner as indicated by your code of ethics.
  • Essential oils are potent, so exercise great care in blending and use. With the exception of lavender, never apply essential oils directly to the skin—instead, mix the recommended amount in a base oil or lotion. Test all oils for sensitivity, and advise your clients to consult their physicians or health care practitioners before using essential oils as indicated.

Inspirations and insights for this blog post were derived from the Techniques in the Spa World Massage Therapy Manual. For more information about aromatherapy continuing education please visit the Ariana Institute for Wellness Education or check out the Aromatic Medicine Blog for Ariana’s personal story and experiences in the realm of aromatherapy.

fb2

fb4

 

Meditation

December 28, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Self Care and Body Mechanics
  • Stretching and Breathing
  • Meditation as a Therapeutic Tool
  • Mindfulness in a Therapeutic Setting

Self Care_BookCoverPreviewThis manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of self care modalities beneficial for yourself and your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about meditation featured in the Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual.

MEDITATION

Meditation has been my saving grace. It has afforded me the opportunity to focus inward, deeply rejuvenate, gain valuable insights, heighten my well-being, and expand the depth with which I can connect inwardly and with those around me.

I initially came to meditation through music. I had a friend in college who was a musician and he invited me to go with him when he performed for a meditation group near my home. The group focused on the teachings of Hazrat Inayat Khan, a prominent spiritual teacher from India, as well as teachings from Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, the Native American traditions, Hinduism, and many other religions. I immediately felt drawn to the sweet energy of this group and began participating in meditative activities, which included studying and paying homage to these religions. We would light a candle for each of the world’s religions and read scripture from the respective holy books. Having grown up in a small Methodist church in San Antonio, this was a true awakening for me. I loved studying and honoring scriptures from many religious and spiritual traditions around the world as much as I loved the dance, the breathing practices, the retreats, the focus on sound, the sense of community, and the heart of the meditations. It was a calming and restorative focus for me during a time when I had just graduated from college and was trying to find my way in the world. Although I’ve moved on from the old boyfriend and the group, I still stay in touch with many friends from this group and count them among my life-long friends.

In a more traditional academic setting, I gained another very powerful experience that deepened my connection with the meditative path when I studied transpersonal counseling at John F. Kennedy University in California in the mid-80s. Several of the courses I took propelled me into a deeper study of meditation and the positive effect of meditation on the body, mind and spirit.

As my life has progressed, and the meditation groups ceased to be as active as they had been in previous decades, I utilized more adaptive options for myself. More recently, I’ve attended Ecstatic Chant workshops at the Omega Institute in upstate New York where luminaries in the spiritual community came together to chant and sing and enjoy fellowship. Those events were quite transforming and profound.

While meditation can often be a solitary practice, it is always a pleasure to connect and reconnect with kindred spirits on the spiritual path who are interested in meditation, contemplation, and taking time out of their busy schedules to rest and reflect and find that indwelling place of peace. The synergist energy that is created when people meditate or pray together can be quite profound and transforming. While I know that meditation is not for everyone, it has been a valuable calming and centering tool for me. I respect and appreciate whatever vehicle people may use to bring themselves to a point of stillness in their lives so they can restore themselves to balance and peace.

Being a meditator has helped me tremendously as a massage therapist and as a massage educator. Incorporating meditation techniques into my personal and professional life has brought about a sense of peace and tranquility where there used to be chaos and unrest. It helps me to perpetuate a calm atmosphere when assessing a new client who has a serious health issue and I feel more relaxed preparing to teach a complex subject to a large group of students. Meditation is a wonderful form of self care. When thinking of my clients, students and colleagues during a meditative session, I always envision them in a serene environment surrounded by a loving energy. Mediation not only helps us set our hearts at ease, but concurrently raises the consciousness of humanity. As Hazrat Inayat Khan said, “Peace comes when the self is in harmony with the rhythm of the heart.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-self-care-for-massage-therapists-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Self Care and Body Mechanics, Stretching and Breathing, Meditation as a Therapeutic Tool and Mindfulness in a Therapeutic Setting CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.  

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.   

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

Exploring the Path of a Massage Therapy Instructor

December 20, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

 

forest-1836654_1280

Choosing Your Path

There are myriad ways you can configure your career as an MTI. You can work part-time or full-time, you can use your experiences as an MTI as a stepping-stone to another career, you can focus on being an MTI as a second career, you can blend teaching with your current vibrant massage therapy practice, or you can supplement your retirement income by becoming an MTI. There are opportunities to work as an independent massage therapy instructor, like I do, you can work as an instructor at an established massage therapy school, and/or you can work for a nationwide company that provides massage therapy classes throughout the U.S.

Once you have been approved as an MTI and you have your MTI license and any other licenses and certifications you may need in order to teach, focus on setting goals for each of the massage therapy courses you wish to teach. Then choose the content and format that will make each course work for you and your students. If you choose a career as an independent MTI, you can utilize the information you gain in your MTI course to begin designing the content of your course notebook and structure. Remember to avoid using other people’s copyrighted material without permission and acknowledgment. If you choose to work as a MTI in a massage school environment, the school administrators will typically provide course notebooks and supporting media for the classroom. You should also think about how you will use technology in the classroom. Practice teaching your newly designed massage course to colleagues and friends and ask for feedback. It is not only an excellent idea to practice teaching, it is a NCBTMB requirement, as stated on their website, “Before submitting an application to NCBTMB for approval, you must have taught the course at least one time within the last year to a group of five or more participants. You must provide the participants with an evaluation requesting feedback on the course, instruction and material.” You could even videotape yourself practice teaching so you can study the pros and cons of your teaching style. An additional way to learn to teach would be to partner with another instructor during the beginning of your career or to serve as an assistant in a classroom.

Teach what you truly love and what you are qualified to teach. Think about how good it feels to have a positive influence in the lives of those around you. Create a structure for your classes in an environment that participants will enjoy. Utilize the information and resources presented in your MTI course material to create the ideal classroom environment. Make sure the classroom is well lit, properly ventilated, clean, comfortable, and that there are appropriate restroom facilities. Decide whether or not you are going to provide massage tables. Make sure to have a balanced percentage of hands-on experiential training and cognitive information. My preferred balance is 80% experiential and 20% cognitive.

Once you have developed your course material, if you are an independent MTI,, focus on setting prices, registering participants, and preparing rosters and certificates of attendance. Set up a spreadsheet to track your income and expenses on a daily basis so you can carefully monitor your progress. It is also important to remember that the first three to five years of any business, including massage therapy education, are building years as you lay the foundation for your ongoing success. Keep the appropriate tax records for the IRS. Also maintain  student records, rosters and course evaluations for NCBTMB and your state massage board. Please be sure to comply with all of your state board rules and regulations.

Develop marketing strategies by taking some marketing classes, reading books that offer tips for successful marketing and utilizing the services of mentors and consultants. The Ariana Institute’s MTI course includes information on marketing your courses as an independent MTI; however, not all MTI courses provide this component in their curriculum. Next, determine what marketing techniques work best for your business and budget. Think of ways to develop compelling descriptive titles for your courses to capture the attention of your students. Believe that you can be successful and surround yourself with competent people who support you in achieving your goals and dreams.

We will next explore ways of finding and creating opportunities to advance your career as an MTI.

Opportunities For Massage Instructors

Search engines come in handy for researching opportunities for massage therapy instructors. If you want to work at a massage school, simply search the name of the city where you want to teach and then enter “massage school” and find out the name of the director of the school and contact that person to see if there are any positions available for MTIs. You could also offer to teach one-time continuing education classes in your area of specialty as well as seeing about becoming a part of the part-time or full-time faculty. Create a proposal for the CE classes you want to teach at the schools and submit it to the school administrators along with your resume and cover letter. Go to events and CE classes at the schools where you are interested in teaching so that you become known in their environment.

If you are interested in teaching for a national massage company that hires instructors, you could do some online research for names and contact information and then follow-up to see if they are hiring.  You could take some courses offered by that company and talk to the instructor to see what his or her teaching experiences with that company have been like.

Another approach to utilizing your MTI certification would be to establish yourself as an independent MTI and CE provider. Design and develop your own course curriculum and market your class to the local community. Once you have achieved your desired level of success, consider expanding your market.

You can develop name recognition by offering to teach classes for local massage groups, such as massage Meetups and local AMTA chapters. On a larger scale, you can submit proposals for state and national conventions, for example, AMTA national conventions and The World Massage Festival.

Consider writing a book on the massage technique that you want to teach. This can help you market yourself as an educator. This can be done for every course, or bundle of courses that you offer.

In today’s technological world, another good marketing avenue is to create instructional videos for your courses and (1) publish them on the web, (2) send them to prospective students, (3) place them on your website, (4) include the URLs for these videos in the books that you publish, and (5) include the URLs in your course notebooks.

Resources for Advanced Information

The Ariana Institute’s Massage Therapy Instructor Course

http://www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/#mti

ABMP Instructor Resource Programs

http://www.abmp.com/instructors/ http://www.abmp.com/instructors/instructor_development.php

AFMTE’s Educational Resources for Massage Therapy Teachers

http://www.afmte.org/teacher-education-resources/

AFMTE’s National Teacher Education Standards Project (NTESP)

http://www.afmte.org/education/tesp-core-competencies/

Coursera Instructional Methods in Health Professions Education

https://www.coursera.org/course/instructmethodshpe

Educational Training Solutions

http://www.educationtrainingsolutions.com/about-us/

ELAP (Entry Level Analysis Project)

http://www.elapmassage.org/

Florida Board of Massage Therapy Education Programs Page

http://floridasmassagetherapy.gov/education-and-training-programs/

NCBTMB Information for Continuing Education Providers

http://www.ncbtmb.org/continuing-education-providers/continuing-education-providers#general

NCBTMB New York Approved CE Sponsor

http://www.ncbtmb.org/continuing-education-providers/ncbtmb-approved-new-york-ce-sponsor

Now that we have explored many options on the MTI path, I’ll leave you with a few thoughts and insights. One of the most important things you can do is to impart the knowledge and wisdom that you have gained over the years. Teaching can be a rewarding and enriching process that benefits the teacher, the student and the recipients of massage. Take time to look inside and see what you can do to let your light shine and manifest your dreams into reality. As Nelson Mandela shared so eloquently, What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.

The information above includes excerpts for an article “Positive Influence: Become a Massage Therapy Instructor,” by Ariana Vincent, originally published in the June 2015 issue of MASSAGE Magazine.

Visit the Ariana Instiute’s website to learn about opportunities and courses for future Massage Therapy Instructors at http://www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/#mti!

fb2fb4

Mother and Child: Enveloped By Love

May 02, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Medical Massage Therapy Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Medical Massage Therapy Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Prenatal Massage
  • Headache and Allergy Relief
  • Lymphatic Massage
  • HIV/AIDS Information for Massage Therapists
  • Pain Management
  • Geriatric Massage

----AI_MEDICAL_BookCoverPreview

This manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of medical massage therapy modalities beneficial for your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about prenatal massage featured in the Medical Massage Therapy Manual.

MOTHER AND CHILD: ENVELOPED BY LOVE

My most memorable prenatal massage experience was with a wonderful woman, who, for the purposes of anonymity, I will call “Angela.” She had been a client for several years, and one day she happily announced that she was pregnant. This was her second marriage and they wanted a child together to compliment the two wonderful and greatly loved children she already had. I happily offered side–lying prenatal massage, being careful to observe the standard prenatal contraindications. While she was still a young woman at the time, she was close to entering the range of high–risk pregnancies. After she completed a thorough intake form and after I received permission from her OB–GYN, we developed a treatment plan that focused on her neck and lower back since her center of gravity was changing, as well as on her feet and legs. Angela and I proceeded with prenatal massage for several weeks until one day she came into my office very downcast. She said that the sonogram revealed multiple severe abnormalities in the fetus and it was feared that the infant would not survive after birth. This was quite a blow. We were in tears. She subsequently lost the fetus. I gave her several post–pregnancy sessions to help restore her to balance after such a tragedy.

Several months passed before I received a call from Angela. I could tell by the sound of her voice that she had good news. She said that she was once again pregnant. The sonogram revealed that she was carrying two very healthy girls; twins! This, combined with other factors and the fact that she was having twins, put her in the high risk prenatal massage category. So I proceeded with her prenatal massage sessions honoring the caveats and contradictions associated with high risk pregnancies. Once again, I contacted Angela’s physician and obtained permission to offer prenatal massage. She had nausea at the beginning the pregnancy, so I was careful not to offer any robust joint mobilization techniques that might have a negative effect on the nausea. The focus once again, at Angela’s request, was on her neck and lower back, as well as her hands and legs. Later in the pregnancy, we included more work on the rhomboids and trapezius as well as the gluteus minimus and piriformis. She responded well to massage therapy and looked forward to every session. She said that coming for her massage sessions was like coming to a sanctuary. I was glad that I had participated in prenatal massage training that included information about high–risk pregnancies and that I had researched high–risk pregnancies for the Ariana Institute Prenatal Massage course.

When the blessed day arrived and the girls were born healthy and happy, we all rejoiced. The experience of helping Angela through two pregnancies was remarkable and profound, and has had a lasting effect. We shared the sorrow of a loss and the joy of bringing two new lives into the world. I love prenatal massage; it spans the full spectrum of human emotion and it is a privilege to be a part of such a miraculous and life–changing experience.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is CEO of the Ariana Institute and a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Medical Massage Therapy Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-medical-massage-therapy-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Headache and Allergy Relief, Lymphatic Massage, HIV/AIDS Information for Massage Therapists, Pain Management, Prenatal Massage, and Geriatric Massage CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Medical Massage Therapy Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

CranioSacral Therapy: A Lighter Touch

April 25, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Advanced Massage Therapy Techniques Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Advanced Massage Therapy Techniques Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • CranioSacral Therapy
  • Sports Massage
  • Chair Massage
  • Deep Tissue Upper Body
  • Deep Tissue Lower Body
  • Addiction Recovery and Therapeutic Massage

----AI_ADVANCED_BookCoverPreview (1) This manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of advanced therapy modalities and techniques beneficial for your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about craniosacral therapy featured in the Advanced Massage Therapy Techniques Manual.

CRANIOSACRAL THERAPY: A LIGHTER TOUCH 

I am a proponent of non–invasive, natural modalities of health care that are seemingly subtle yet have profound and transformative effects. CranioSacral Therapy (CST) definitely falls in this category.

I have a deep admiration for Dr. John Upledger and the phenomenal work that he did in creating and developing training systems for CST.

My personal experience receiving CST was when I received a session after some extremely painful dental work. One of my colleagues was a trained CranioSacral practitioner. She kindly offered a session for me. I had never experienced CST before and I was amazed at the efficacy of the treatment and I appreciated the relief I felt. In that moment, I decided to learn more about this seemingly subtle, yet very transformative modality.

The first formal Upledger CST class I participated in was taught by a brilliant and articulate physical therapist who received her CST training at the Upledger Institute. I was very inspired by the depth of her knowledge and her enthusiasm for the subject matter. Her class was well organized and we had a good balance of cognitive information and hands–on training

My second CST class was in a big hotel in Houston and, unfortunately, this instructor and his assistants were all over the map and the ballroom that we used as a classroom was freezing, which was not conducive to exchanging sessions or to creating a pleasant learning environment. The class was inappropriately skewed toward cognitive and scientific data rather than hands–on experiential learning. It provided a wonderful opportunity for me to learn what not to do when offering continuing education classes for massage therapists.

After exchanging many CST sessions with my colleagues, watching videos, and doing independent research, I began offering CranioSacral in my private practice in Austin more than 15 years ago. I appreciated the efficacy of the treatments. I enjoy the lightness of touch in a CranioSacral session; it offered a marked contrast to the deep tissue work that was also part of my pantheon of modalities.

I quickly realized that CST is a modality that I could offer late into my career because it does not require a tremendous amount of strength or stamina since the touch is only about five grams of pressure, “like a leaf on the water.”

After years of working part–time for other people, I decided to venture on my own and focus all of my time on the development of my own massage practice and continuing education school because I knew it would lead to a greater impact on the massage community and greater financial independence. I synthesized all of my research into CST and I developed the Ariana Institute CranioSacral Therapy Continuing Education class and I also incorporated many of the relevant CST techniques in the Ariana Institute’s Headache and Allergy Relief CE class. The classes were well received and I was very grateful.

The scope of conditions that CST can affect positively is amazing. I have witnessed and experienced profound transformations as a result of CranioSacral Therapy’s gentle, yet effective, hands–on approach to wellness therapy.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is CEO of the Ariana Institute and a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Advanced Massage Therapy Techniques Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-advanced-massage-therapy-techniques-manual-and-ce-courses/.

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the CranioSacral Therapy, Sports Massage, Chair Massage, Deep Tissue Upper and Lower Body, as well as Addiction Recovery and Therapeutic Massage CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Advanced Massage Therapy Techniques Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

Mindfulness

April 18, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Self Care and Body Mechanics
  • Stretching and Breathing
  • Meditation as a Therapeutic Tool
  • Mindfulness in a Therapeutic Setting

Self Care_BookCoverPreviewThis manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of self care modalities beneficial for yourself and your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about mindfulness featured in the Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual.

MINDFULNESS

Mindfulness came into my life as a focus when I began studying the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk, scholar and author. I was introduced to his work by my friend, Paméla Overeyender. The primary focus of his teaching is that, through mindfulness, we can learn to live happily in the present moment and through this focus we can help develop inner peace and worldwide peace. In the 60s, he taught Comparative Religion at Princeton University and Buddhism at Columbia University. He and his group of devotees at the Plum Village monasteries have set up Mindfulness Practice Centers throughout the world. His writings on mindfulness and his devotion to working for world peace have influenced me and encouraged me to become a more mindful person focused on present time awareness.

I have also been influenced by Dr. Dean Ornish, a physician, president and founder of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, who is most well known for the Ornish Lifestyle Medicine program he created to prevent and reverse chronic diseases with lifestyle changes and Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The attention to mindfulness in regards to a person’s overall health has been steadily increasing in the medical community with the work that these two continue to produce. I have deep admiration and respect for the good work both of these physicians are doing in the mindfulness community on a national and international level.

I am happy to see how helpful practicing mindfulness has been to me throughout my career as a massage therapist and massage therapy educator. The practice of mindfulness has helped me be more focused in every moment and has led me to a deep sense of inner peace and calm. I feel that I am better able to be more empathetic and understanding in relationships with my clients and students as a result of studying mindfulness based techniques and incorporating them into my personal and professional life. What I’ve noticed the most about practicing mindfulness is that it helps me to live life more fully in the present moment and be more actively conscious of the world around me. Practicing mindfulness has enhanced my sensitivity in the present moment while reducing the effects of unnecessary worry that occurs when I take myself out of present-time awareness.

To quote the yoga master, Swami Satchidananda, You can’t control the waves, but you can learn how to surf.Mindfulness can give you tools to learn to surf amid the inevitable waves that come with life incarnate in human form.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-self-care-for-massage-therapists-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Self Care and Body Mechanics, Stretching and Breathing, Meditation as a Therapeutic Tool and Mindfulness in a Therapeutic Setting CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.  

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Self Care for the Massage Therapist Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.   

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

Soothing the Transition of Life

April 11, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Medical Massage Therapy Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Medical Massage Therapy Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Headache and Allergy Relief
  • Lymphatic Massage
  • HIV/AIDS Information for Massage Therapists
  • Pain Management
  • Prenatal Massage
  • Geriatric Massage

----AI_MEDICAL_BookCoverPreview

This manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of medical massage therapy modalities beneficial for your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about geriatric massage featured in the Medical Massage Therapy Manual.

SOOTHING THE TRANSITION OF LIFE

I had a wonderfully rewarding experience offering massage to a geriatric client in New England in 2012 as he was in his final months of life. The experience helped remind me of the wonderful comfort and reassurance that compassionate and therapeutic touch can offer geriatric clients, especially those that are in the process of passing.

For the sake of privacy, I’ll refer to this client as “Robert.” Robert lived to be 101 years old and he lived a long, full life that had a positive influence on those around him. Although Robert was elderly when we met, he was certainly not defined by his age.

I flew to Cape Cod on May 12, 2011, to meet Robert. The next day was Robert’s 101st birthday and we celebrated at The Chatham Bars Inn in Chatham, Massachusetts.

I spent my first encounter with Robert sitting on the couch, quietly talking with him while we put together an album of his photos from Hawaii during WWII. We quickly grew comfortable with each other’s company.

I asked him if he would like a foot massage and his blue eyes twinkled. He said, “I don’t know, I’ve never had a massage. Would I?” He was willing to try it and that began a regular routine of foot and hand massage at his home, later in the hospital, and finally in an extended care facility.

While visiting Robert, I also made arrangements to meet with my Compassionate Touch Instructor, Lisa Curran Parenteau, who happened to live in the Cape, just a few miles from Robert. Lisa introduced me to one of her students who lived in the Cape and we made arrangements for her to come for a few geriatric massage sessions with Robert when I was out of town.  She also offered chair massage to Robert’s family when they visited him in the hospital. In Robert’s final days, Lisa volunteered to come sit with him at his extended care facility. She played his favorite music for him and he brightened up each time she entered the room. I will always have a fond place in my heart for her selfless service and loving compassion.

Robert passed away at the extended care facility on March 6, 2012, ten months after our original meeting. I visited him often during that ten–month period, flying from Austin to the Cape to be with him. I offered him my quiet, comforting presence and frequent hand and foot massages. I was with him just a few days before he passed, offering him Compassionate Touch and soothing him during the final stage of his transition. He passed peacefully with his daughter, Catherine, and long–time caregiver, Louise, by his side.

The experience of knowing Robert and offering massage to him in his final months reminded me of the important impact we, as massage therapists and caregivers, have on those we touch. There is no doubt that the massage sessions that Robert was given helped to calm his mind and soothe his body.

It can be easy to forget that the practice of massage is more than just a career. It is a practice that can be important and life changing on the individual, personal level. The nurturing elements of massage can help clients in all walks of life and this particular experience reminded me how important it can be for the geriatric community and those near the end of life.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is the CEO of the Ariana Institute for Wellness Education and a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Medical Massage Therapy Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-medical-massage-therapy-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Headache and Allergy Relief, Lymphatic Massage, HIV/AIDS Information for Massage Therapists, Pain Management, Prenatal Massage, and Geriatric Massage CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Medical Massage Therapy Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

The Importance of Ethics in the Massage Profession

April 04, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Marketing and Practice Building for Massage Therapists Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Marketing and Practice Building for Massage Therapists Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Ethics
  • Marketing and Practice Building

Marketing_Practice_BuildingBookCoverPreview This manual is designed to help deepen the understanding of ethics and practice building for current massage therapists and introduce new, upcoming massage therapists to innovative and creative ways to create a successful, thriving massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about ethics featured in the Marketing and Practice Building for Massage Therapists Manual.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ETHICS IN THE MASSAGE PROFESSION

Misconceptions about massage therapists have been reduced due to the increased focus on ethics in the massage profession. This shift is the result of the many efforts from those outside of the massage community and those within it. National and local massage organizations and publications have contributed greatly to the recognition of the massage therapy profession as a viable and valuable form of health care. Codes of ethics have been created and ethics committees have been formed to inform and protect massage therapists and the public regarding the importance of ethics in the massage profession.

The rules and regulations of various state boards and licensing entities exemplify the efforts made to improve the standards of the massage therapy community. Influential politicians and members of law enforcement agencies on the national, state and local level have worked tirelessly to help move prostitution and human trafficking out from under the veil of massage therapy and rightfully expose and eradicate these illegal activities.

Contributions outside of those governing organizations include books and articles, and classes created by numerous massage therapists regarding the importance of ethical behavior in the massage community. Thousands of people nationwide have poured their hearts and souls into efforts to create, sustain, and encourage an ethical massage community and thus enhance the integrity and public perception of the massage profession as health care professionals.

Although large strides have been made, the effort is ongoing. Massage therapists hold a responsibility to practice their profession in ways that are ethical and moral and to encourage their colleagues to do the same. As values between work and self often overlap, I am reminded of the following quote, “A satisfying and balanced life occurs when your values are in sync with the way you lead your life and run your business. Your values are the major conscious and unconscious influences on the decisions you make throughout your life.” – The Ethics of Touch by Cherie Sohnen–Moe and Ben Benjamin.

Our goal is that the Ethics chapter in The Ariana Institute’s Marketing and Practice Building Manual contributes to a deepening of focus regarding the importance of maintaining an ethical perspective in the massage profession.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is the CEO of the Ariana Institute and a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Marketing and Practice Building for Massage Therapists Manual, which contains a chapter on ethics, please visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-marketing-and-practice-building-for-massage-therapists-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Ethics, Marketing and Practice Building Massage CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Marketing and Practice Building for Massage Therapists Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.  

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

The Immeasurable Reiki Path

March 28, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Mind-Body Therapy Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Mind-Body Therapy Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Soothing PTSD and Trauma
  • Reiki Level One
  • Reiki Level Two
  • Reiki Level Three (Master/Teacher Level)

----AI_MIND-BODY_BookCoverPreview

This manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of mind-body therapy modalities beneficial for your massage practice and your personal well-being.

Here’s a personal story about Reiki featured in the Mind-Body Therapy Manual.

THE IMMEASURABLE REIKI PATH

Reiki comes to people in myriad ways; some experiences begin in a seemingly subtle way and then expand to a profound place in our lives. That was certainly the case for me.

I began traveling on the path of Reiki many years ago when I was part of a meditation group in Austin. One of my fellow–meditators, Sherry, introduced me to the benefits and protocols of Reiki. We talked about how the Reiki symbols can be used as a centering technique to help still the mind and stay steady in a fast–paced world. I was immediately attracted to the seemingly simple and noninvasive modality.

In addition to our conversations, Sherry offered to give a Reiki session to me. That became a pivotal turning point in my life. I felt peaceful, relaxed, and centered during and after the session. Upon further reflection, I noted that I felt significantly transformed by the experience. The racing thoughts, or as we called them in our meditation classes, the “jumping monkeys,” were stilled and calm; it became easier to be focused in the present moment instead of feeling distracted by a constant litany of thoughts that drew me away from living a focused life. I was so impressed that I very quickly made a decision to study Reiki in order to deepen my knowledge and begin sharing this wonderful modality with others.

I was offered an opportunity to study Reiki Level One, Reiki Level Two, and Reiki Level Three (Master/Teacher) with Denise, a wonderful woman from Wimberley. She took me under her wing and included me in her Reiki classes. I was going through a very challenging time in my life and was just about as far from centered as I had ever been. Learning about Dr. Mikao Usui’s Reiki lineage brought comfort and focus to my life. I was very grateful.

Little did I know at the time that I would eventually utilize my Reiki Level Three training with Denise to become a Reiki instructor and begin offering courses for others. Not only did I offer Reiki treatments, either as an independent modality, or in conjunction with other treatments, after several years of practicing I also began researching Reiki for the development of my Reiki course notebooks. It was a very profound time of growth and expansion for me. I learned to approach the world with more of a calm mind and a more peaceful and mindful consciousness.

Especially meaningful ways of utilizing Reiki are for clients who are suffering from PTSD and prefer a light touch or prefer to have the therapist’s hand hovering a few inches above the body, and for oncology clients who benefit from energetic holding over certain areas of the body where touch would not be indicated. The beauty of Reiki is that it is non–invasive and it can be offered anywhere, with the client fully clothed, or it can be offered in conjunction with other modalities including deep tissue therapy, Swedish massage, prenatal massage, and facial massage, to name a few.

It is with gratitude that I continue on the Reiki path, teaching and practicing, and observing the Reiki principles in my daily life. The experience of being introduced to Reiki has been profound and transforming. I love the seemingly subtle nature of Reiki and the dynamic changes that I have experienced and have witnessed occurring in my clients and students.

As J. Krishnamurti so beautifully shared, “When the mind is no longer seeking, no longer breeding conflict through its wants and cravings, when it is silent with understanding, only then can the immeasurable come into being.” It is through focus on my Reiki path that the immeasurable has come into being and chaos has been replaced with peace.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent is a Reiki Master Teacher and CEO of the Ariana Institute. She was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Mind-Body Therapy Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institutes-mind-body-therapy-manual-and-ce-courses/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Soothing PTSD and Trauma, Reiki Level One, Level Two, as well as Level Three (Master/Teacher) CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Mind-Body Therapy Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.   

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

 

Aromatic Medicine

March 21, 2016 by Ariana Vincent, CEO of the Ariana Institute

The Ariana Institute’s Techniques in the Spa World Manual is part of a series of massage manuals that are designed to help deepen the knowledge of current massage therapists and introduce new massage therapists to the world of massage and bodywork.

The Techniques in the Spa World Manual features topics that are also available as NCBTMB approved online CE courses through the Ariana Institute at www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/, including:

  • Aromatherapy for Massage and Bodywork
  • Ayurvedic Massage
  • Couples Massage
  • Hot and Cold Stone Massage
  • Spa Techniques: Exfoliations and Body Wraps

Techniques in the Spa World_BookCoverPreview_08-19-15

This manual incorporates detailed protocols, photos, links to online videos, marketing strategies, personal stories, and resources to encourage a comprehensive understanding of spa techniques and modalities beneficial for your massage practice.

Here’s a personal story about aromatherapy featured in the Techniques in the Spa World Manual.

AROMATIC MEDICINE

My informal introduction to aromatherapy was when I visited my grandmother in Kansas City as a child. She had beautiful, expansive gardens in her backyard filled with an abundance of fragrant flowers and plants. I especially remember the scents from the variety of roses that infused my little six-year-old heart with joy. The wonderful experience of playing in the fragrance of grandmother’s garden with my cousins set the stage for my lifelong love of aromas and their therapeutic benefits.

As my attraction towards pleasant aromas persisted, I began my formal training in aromatherapy while attending massage school, I continued in my private practice as I proceeded to expand my knowledge of aromatherapy’s therapeutic effects. I loved collecting aromatherapy products while I practiced and studied, especially my favorite essential oils: rose, lemongrass, sandalwood, tangerine, bergamot, and eucalyptus. I have tested a variety of brands to find the perfect fit for my practice. Clients have even brought essential oils to me as gifts: sandalwood from Mysore, India, and rose oil from Bulgaria and France. It was a delightful experience assessing and collecting essential oils from various parts of the world.

Mixing the essential oils is another aspect that I love about aromatherapy. Having multiple oils offered during the course of a session can elevate the experience for the client.  For example, rose essential oil on the face, lemongrass on the body, and sandalwood on the feet as the feet were wrapped in warm, moist towels can all be performed in one session and provide different types of relief.

Over the years one of my best resources for enhancing my knowledge about essential oils has been Melissa Gonzales, a seasoned massage therapist. She also owns Morning Star Trading Company, a source of quality massage and aromatherapy supplies, located in Austin, Texas. Melissa has provided me with a wealth of information regarding the best brands of aromatherapy essential oils, the benefits of various oils, the proportion of dilution of the oils with a carrier oil, and the storage and shelf life of oils. Morning Star Trading Company also carried a vast library of aromatherapy reference books that proved to be valuable resources as I continued to educate myself in the therapeutic benefits of aromatherapy.

Pursuing my interest in this particular practice became an immense asset as I advanced in my profession.  Every spa that I worked in since the beginning of my career thirty years ago offered aromatherapy for its clients. It seemed that the bigger the spa, the more expansive the aromatherapy menu. Most of the spas focused on offering lavender, peppermint, ylang ylang, orange, and eucalyptus. The aromatherapy essential oils were typically included with a carrier oil or lotion during a massage therapy session, or added to a body wrap or exfoliation during special treatments. Some spas even had signature brands and blends that we used and were sold to clients who wanted to take some of the spa experience home with them. One spa had an aromatherapy diffuser in the reception area so when clients arrived, they would experience a distinctive fragrance that they could associate with that particular environment. Spas were an environment that afforded me the opportunity to continue exploring this medium while practicing aromatherapy professionally outside of school or independent study.

When I made the decision to begin offering aromatherapy continuing education courses for massage therapists, I did more extensive research in order to design and develop my course curriculum. I spent over twenty years gathering information about the benefits and uses of aromatherapy essential oils. I have researched, analyzed, practiced and  experienced aromatherapy; so it was a happy day when I began offering hands-on and online CE courses in aromatherapy for massage therapists. My years of studying and experiencing the efficacy of aromatherapy essential oils were fruitful in myriad ways, and the Ariana Institute’s Aromatherapy continuing education course has become one of the most popular CE courses in our repertoire.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – ARIANA VINCENT, LMT, MTI, BCTMB

Ariana Vincent was awarded the 2015 CE Provider of the Year Award by the Alliance for Massage Therapy Education. She is a Nationally Certified Massage Therapy Instructor whose classes are accepted throughout the United States. Ariana is also a Massage Therapy Hall of Fame Honoree and author of the Ariana Institute’s therapy manual series available on Amazon.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

To read the foreword of the Techniques in the Spa World Manual, visit http://www.arianainstitute.com/the-ariana-institute-proudly-presents-techniques-in-the-spa-world-second-edition/.  

The Ariana Institute’s video introduction to the Aromatherapy, Ayurvedic Massage, Couples Massage, Hot and Cold Stone Massage, as well as other Spa Technique CE courses can be accessed on the Ariana Institute’s YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/ArianaInstitute.

To order your copies of the Ariana Institute’s Techniques in the Spa World Manual, visit www.amazon.com/author/arianavincent.   

For additional information about the Ariana Institute and to register for online continuing education and MTI courses visit www.arianainstitute.com/ce-online/.

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

Ariana Vincent, LMT, MTI, NCTMB

← Older posts